Kilimanjaro: Our journey to the Top of Africa

During our entire hike to the peak of Kilimanjaro, I kept a journal, writing my observations every day. The following are my journal entries, almost verbatim.

Our journey in a nutshell

Day 1 – Hakuna Matata
Date: Aug 15, 2017
Start: Lemosho Gate (2,100 m)
End: Mti Mkubwa Camp (2,650 m)

Jambo Africa! We arrived in Tanzania on Sunday, Aug 13th and spent the next day relaxing at the Springlands Hotel. I was actually quite jet lagged, so I’m happy we took a rest day. We met our guide Issa, rented sleeping bags, hiking poles and other gear, and packed for our hike.

Today we officially started our climb! We met our team of porters, a chef, and assistant guide, and we were driven first to register for the hike and weigh our bags, and later to the starting point.

At the Lemosho Gate, right before starting our climb

We arrived at the Lemosho gate around 1:45 pm and had a picnic lunch. There were huge black and white fluffy monkeys in the trees! We already saw some zebras and giraffes on our drive earlier today, so the monkeys are a great bonus.

At 2:00 pm, we officially started to climb Kilimanjaro. We were going through the rainforest part of the mountain, as that is the landscape that exists at the lower altitude. There are lots of trees all around with branches resembling ropes, just hanging down from the trees. We saw the black and white monkeys again several times as well as blue monkeys.

Rami and our guide Issa starting to walk on the trail

When we started the climb, the rainforest was dead silent, but soon enough we heard various birds singing or calling each other. There weren’t any insects except for some red ants on the ground and a caterpillar. Apparently the red ants bite, but to keep them out, you can sprinkle some salt around your tent since they are afraid of it.

The lower part of Kilimanjaro is characterized by the rainforest

The weather is a bit unpredictable. If you’re not moving, you will be cold just standing under the shady canopy of the trees, It also rained intermittently throughout our hike, but our rain jackets saved us. In the sun, it can easily get pretty hot, especially if you’re climbing uphill.

Taking the very first few steps on the Lemosho trail

The climb wasn’t very steep today and we completed it in just two hours instead of three hours that is usually expected for this distance. But the ground was full of tree roots, so we had to really watch where we stepped.

Our camp is great so far! Our tent includes a sleeping area that is sectioned off, with mattresses on which we can put our sleeping bags. The other area has a folding table and chairs where we will eat our dinner. We also have our own private toilet in a separate tent that is pitched nearby.

We arrived at our first camp!
Our tent – home for the next week!
I downloaded an app that measures the elevation of where you are. It seems to be fairly accurate. Here’s a reading from our camp
Our private toilet tent
Our teeny tiny sit-down toilet in our toilet tent

Our team is feeding us well. We snacked on some popcorn and tea while awaiting dinner.

Washing our hands in small plastic tubs before dinner
Our first dinner. Some soup to warm up and hydrate, followed by so much food!
Mmm, dinner

There is also a huge monkey that was walking around the tents earlier. Ahh! As I’m writing this , the monkey nearly gave me a heart attack by poking its head into our tent! We had to shoo it away.

The monkey that was hanging around the campground, and peeked its head into our tent

So far there’s nothing to worry about, although I can see how it could easily get pretty cold up here. But for now, hakuna matata!

Day 2 – Pole, Pole!
Date: Aug 16, 2017
Start: Mti Mkubwa Camp (2,650 amsl)
End: Shira One Camp (3,610 amsl)

“Pole, Pole!” in Swahili means slowly, slowly. That is the exact strategy that is used by our guide as well as many others in order to successfully summit Kilimanjaro. You don’t want to ascend too high, too quickly because you will exert unnecessary energy and you will sweat a lot, potentially leaving you dehydrated. So it’s best to take it one step at a time.

Yesterday the slow pace surprised me and actually tired me out when we walked on flat terrain. But today I welcomed the Pole Pole strategy with open arms as we climbed up almost 1,000 m from 2,650 m at the Mti Mkubwa (Big Tree) campsite to 3,610 m at Shira One Camp.

Starting our hike on Day 2
Even though we depart our camp while our tents are still there, very soon the porters pass us by carrying the tents, provisions and other equipment

The day started out pretty cold. In fact, Rami and I were a bit cold at night even though we had a couple of layers on and slept in sleeping bags rated for -30oC. So when we resumed our hike today through the shady forest, I was wearing a wool base layer, a fleece and a rain-jacket to keep warm.

It was also very new to us to sleep on the ground in a tent. I’ve only done this once before on a school trip to Algonquin Park in grade ten, while Rami had never camped. Our bodies were sore in the morning after sleeping on the hard ground.

The forest changed a bit from the rainforest we hiked through yesterday to one of those enchanted forests you read about and imagine in fairy tales. It was dark and full of dense trees that had green, hair-like vegetation drooping from the branches. It’s as if we were in some ancient story or fairy tale, walking happily on the trail between these dense trees, just minutes away from something bad happening to us.

With our guide Issa and assistant guide Seleman in the enchanted forest
Taking a break among the trees in the enchanted forest

But nothing happened, and soon enough the forest ended abruptly and was replaced by tall bushes on both sides of the trail. From here on until our next camp, the ground was full of dust and rocks of various proportions. This dust managed to get everywhere – in my nose and in my mouth, on my clothes and on my daypack, and all over my hiking boots to the point where I couldn’t see their original colour anymore.

The trail changed once we exited the forest

The temperature changed as well, with the sun beaming down on us and no shade in sight to hide under. I had to peel away my layers and regretted that I didn’t wear a t-shirt instead.

On the trail with the temperature getting much warmer now that there’s no shade

From here it was not an easy climb. Some people say Kilimanjaro is a “walk-up” mountain, and I suppose it is in some areas. But the terrain we tackled today was basically like walking up the stairs for about four hours. Thank god Rami and I started doing Bikini Body Guide (BBG) workouts in preparation for this trip as those workouts had a lot of step-up exercises. Today was like a four-hour-long step-up exercise, made harder by the fact that each rock we stepped on was different and was a bit slippery because of the dust.

Taking a break after climbing for what seemed like forever under the scorching sun

Today was definitely a challenge. At one point, I found myself to be a bit frustrated – with myself, with the hot weather, and with the never-ending trail that just kept going up and up at a steep angle. “But this is only day two!” I kept telling myself. I knew I had to push myself.

The altitude also makes it harder to breathe as the air gets thinner and less oxygen is available, which only adds to the challenge.

As we climbed to the top of one ridge, we finally saw the peak of Kilimanjaro. Covered partially in clouds, it stood there a bit intimidating to be honest. I can’t believe that (hopefully) we will climb all of this way to the top.

The first time we saw the peak of Kilimanjaro

Our hike today took just under five hours, including our walk through the enchanted forest and a short stop for lunch.

We finally made it to our second camp. So tired!
Our tent was already set up and ready for relaxing
This view though!
Admiring the peak and contemplating the next few days that lie ahead
Can’t get enough of this view

Right now we are relaxing at our camp, awaiting dinner and admiring the peak.

In the evening, we took a group photo with our entire team: one guide, one assistant guide, one chef and five porters.
Group selfie with our team!

Day 3 – Above the clouds
Date: Aug 17, 2017
Start: Shira One Camp (3,610 amsl)
End: Shira Two Camp (3,850 amsl)

We had another cold night last night even though we were wearing even more layers this time. I think I drifted in and out of sleep the entire night, waking up from the cold. But on the plus side, every time I woke up at night to use the washroom, I would notice the night sky. It was so dark with hundreds of stars shining down on us. I’ve never seen the stars so clearly in my life. Rami spotted the Big Dipper, and I for the first time ever saw what I think was the Milky Way. It is also dead quiet here at night. The silence is deafening!

The nights are pitch dark, but the sky is full of stars
Not impressed by the cold

As soon as the sun comes up, it starts to get noticeable warmer. Our hike today took us across the Shira plateau, and I gradually peeled away my layers one by one until I was left wearing a t-shirt. That is how powerful the sun can be here, especially at these higher altitudes.

Our trail today included a wonderful view of Kilimanjaro
Walking across the Shira plateau

Today was not a particularly hard day. In fact, today was meant as a day for acclimatization. We walked across the moorlands for a long time, mostly walking on flat ground.

Once the sun comes up, it gets warm really fast

Here and there, our guide Issa pointed out animal poop from buffalos and mountain goats. He explained that at times, a fog descends on the moorlands, and the animals get lost and wander around until the dog is lifted. Other than that, no animals live on the moors.

We then approached the base of a peak that we needed to climb in order to acclimatize. The trail steepened, but I also noticed many trees covered with droopy, hair-like vegetation, similar to the enchanted forest from yesterday. We could see the Uhuru Peak from our trail easily and clearly as the clouds surrounding it parted.

Droopy hair-like vegetation on tree branches on our trail
Rami with our guide and assistant guide

We climbed to the top of the peak called Cathedral Point, which is at 3,872 m above sea level. The most astonishing thing was that we ended up standing there at the peak, looking down upon a fluffy blanket of clouds surrounding us. We were above the clouds! Besides being in an airplane, I had never been above the clouds before. With the sun shining, the clouds looked like a never-ending swimming pool, inviting us for a swim in its fluffiness.

At Cathedral Point
Happy to be above the clouds
Clouds below us
That’s where we’re going!
Doing some push-ups at Cathedral Point to get used to the altitude

We concluded our hike by making our way to Shira Two Camp, which required us to descend quite a bit and then climb back up to 3,850 m elevation. All in all, our hike today lasted about 4.5 hours. It wasn’t too bad at all, but I noticed my upper back on my right side was hurting a lot. I’m not sure if it’s my lung that’s giving me trouble from my heavy breathing during the climb, or if my backpack is not sitting right on me.

We are required to carry 3L of water with us in our daypacks every day. Combined with my DSLR and extra layers of clothing, my daypack weighed 5kg today. I’m going to try and lighten it up a bit tomorrow.

At Shira 2 Camp
We are required to register at every camp we reach. Here I am registering at Shira 2 with our guide Issa

At camp, our tent was already set up as always and we washed our hands with warm water and soap in small plastic tubs. Shortly after, we were served a hot lunch consisting of chicken stew with potatoes and vegetables, as well as muffins, avocado and hot tea. We are very happy with the food that’s provided to us so far. It actually tastes good and there’s so much of it! We have never been able to finish a single meal so far – that’s how much food we’re given!

Today I noticed that when the hike is fairly gentle, stupid songs get stuck in my head for hours at a time as I daydream and walk in my own zone. For example, we saw a white-neck raven today – a huge bird with shiny black feathers. All I could think about afterwards was a Russian song “Vorona”, which means “raven”.

We also came across an area meant as a helicopter landing area to rescue hikers that fall dangerously ill. Shortly after, we encountered an ambulance that took away one of the hikers, driving down the only road that runs through the Kili National Park. It’s scary to think that it’s possible to get very sick here. But thank god, we haven’t felt altitude sickness at all so far.

A place for a helicopter to land in case it needs to rescue sick hikers
Concluding the day with a sunset photo of the clouds

Day 4 – Lava Tower
Date: Aug 18, 2017
Start: Shira Two Camp (3,850 amsl)
End: Barranco Camp (3,900 amsl)

Last night we actually had our first good sleep on the mountain! But it took a lot of layers to keep us warm. I personally was wearing four: a t-shirt, my wool base layer, my red poofy jacket and a down jacket that we rented from Zara Tours. We woke up refreshed and ready to tackle the day.

We started off walking uphill through the alpine dessert, with lava-covered rocks scattered around us. It was a steady, uphill trek, but the angle of incline wasn’t very steep.

The trail wasn’t very steep today

As it happens every day, porters from our own tour company and all the others passed us by. I was once again amazed at how much stuff they carry, often wearing running shoes instead of hiking boots. They tend to carry the heaviest things on their heads because it’s apparently easier since there is less weight pulling them back. They get to camp or the lunch spot way before us to set up everything and cook for us. We later learned that a porter, who is just starting out, earns only about USD$40-50 for the entire duration of the trip. It seems like such a small amount, but for them it’s clearly worthwhile.

Porters passing us by on the trail

The goal of today was to reach a big rock called the Lava Tower, sitting at 4,600 m above sea level. Starting at Shira Two Camp at 3,850 m, we were able to complete this 750 m ascent in just shy of four hours.

We reached Lava Tower! The weather got colder, so we have to wear our jackets now
At Lava Tower with our guide
Pointing to Lava Tower
Here it is!

At the Lava Tower, our tent was temporarily set up with our dining table and chairs. We were quickly served a hot lunch consisting of fried chicken, veggies, sweet potatoes, French toast, juice and some sliced pineapple. We spent an hour eating lunch at this altitude in order to acclimatize.

Enjoying our hot lunch

It was actually quite gloomy as we were literally inside a cloud with low visibility. It was easy to get cold just sitting in one place without moving.

The sun disappeared as we reached Lava Tower. The day became a bit gloomy
Tents from another tour company sitting in the cloud for lunch at Lava Tower

After lunch we actually started descending to our next camp – the Barranco camp at 3,900 m high. Here we will spend the night.

We made it to our next camp!

Our descent took us through another moorlands landscape, along a stream that carries water from the glacier that sits at the top of Kilimanjaro. It’s important to note that the water we’re given to drink on this entire climb comes from the mountain itself – either from a nearby river or a glacial stream. Our team then boils the water and gives it to us. But of course we also use our own water purification tablets to clean the water before we drink it just to be safe.

Going down to Barranco Camp for the night

I found the descent to the Barranco camp a bit difficult on my knees. At times the trail was a bit slippery as well and it was easy to lose your balance if you weren’t careful. But the sights all around us were magnificent. It was possible to see a cross-section of the mountain, enveloped in clouds. There was also a lot of green vegetation. We even saw a little blue bird drinking from one of the plants.

These cool trees were everywhere on our descent to Barranco Camp. I couldn’t help but take a picture with one of them
This plant closes at night because the weather gets colder. But during the day it opens and collects water, so that little birds can drink from it

Besides mild headaches that seem to have disappeared, Rami and I don’t feel any symptoms of altitude sickness. I hope it stays this way.

The view from our camp tonight
Enjoying the view
The sun came out for a short little bit right before dinner at our camp
Rami being dramatic by airing out his tired feet and hiking boots

Our camp for tonight as well as the last portion of today’s trek was a lot busier because today our Lemosho route joined with Machame route at the Lava Tower. There are literally a hundred tents at our campground and it is noticeable nosier. This also means that there will be a lot more people traffic from now on until the very peak. But as our guides say, this is not a competition. We just have to take it one step at a time.

Day 5 – The Barranco Wall
Date: Aug 19, 2017
Start: Barranco Camp (3,900 amsl)
End: Karanga Camp (3,995 amsl)

After another chilly night, we got ready for our climb. These cold nights are really not fun to be honest. I even noticed some frost on the top of our tent this morning.

Washing my hands in the warm water before breakfast. Brr!

But there is nothing that gets your heart pumping, your blood flowing and your body warmer than climbing. This is especially true if you’re faced with an almost vertical incline. The Barranco Wall is exactly that. There is barely even a trail. Instead we were climbing from one boulder to another, holding onto jagged rocks for balance. Thank god the exercises we did as part of our prep for this trip included lots of squats and step-ups. Today more than any other day it was all about the leg muscles and being able to lift your knee to your chest as you placed your foot on the rock and then use that leg to step up on top of that rock.

THIS is our “trail” for this morning
Following our guide on the Barranco Wall
Putting those leg muscles to real work today

One rock after another, we continued to climb the Barranco Wall. Clouds would surround us and then pass, but overall it felt like we were climbing in a fog the entire time. We reached the top of the Barranco Wall in one and a half hours, ascending over 340 m from our last night’s campsite. It was quite the achievement – 340 m in 1.5 hours! Usually hikers take about two hours to reach the top.

We made it to the top of the Barranco Wall
Yeah!
Just a white cloud behind us at this point

We spent fifteen minutes at the top taking pictures of the clouds that covered our view and congratulating each other. The porters have to climb the exact same wall, all the while wearing heavy backpacks and balancing baskets full of camping equipment on their heads.

Afterwards we resumed our hike, this time walking a little bit downhill towards our campsite. Perhaps I misunderstood our guide, but for some reason I thought our descent to our camp is going to be gentle and uneventful. I was happily walking down the trail, admiring the lava rocks around me covered with black and hairy moss. There were some yellow and white flowers on the way. The weather was cold, but I was fine wearing my jacket.

Happily walking along the trail, enjoying the slight decline
Taking the time to really enjoy my surroundings
Just a little incline in the trail and some rocks on the way
Rami and the assistant guide happily walking along the trail down to our camp

Finally our guide pointed out our campsite in the distance. It looked maybe fifteen minutes away, and I started picturing a hot lunch waiting for us.
Imagine my shock when instead of going straight towards our campsite, we suddenly came across a very deep valley. I was floored and then a little bit discouraged. I came to realize that we had to descend all the way down to the floor of the valley and then climb all the way back to its other side! “How inefficient!” I thought to myself.

WHAT IS THAT?! At this point, I was really shocked to see this valley and realize that we have to go all the way down in order to go up that path you see there on the other side

The Karanga Valley was definitely not the most fun part of the day. Its slopes are steep and often just made up of dirt. Without ricks on the path, you don’t have much traction. As a result, it’s very easy to slip and fall. Luckily there were many trees along the way, and I grasped them for balance.

After climbing all the way back up to the other side of the valley, we arrived at the Karanga Camp sitting at 3,995 m above sea level.

Finally reached our camp for the night

Here we just had a delicious hot lunch of fried chicken, French fries, salad, fruits and hot tea. All in all, we completed 3 hours and 45 minutes of hiking today.

Okay, this hot lunch makes up for the Karanga Valley. Yum!
As the evening approached, our tent was swallowed by a cloud
As was our private toilet tent

Tomorrow we will finally hike to the Base Camp of Kilimanjaro!

Day 6 – Base Camp
Date: Aug 20, 2017
Start: Karanga Camp (3,995 amsl)
End: Base Camp (4,673 amsl)

Today is a critical day as not only did we have to hike to Base Camp in the morning, but at night we start our ascent to the top of Kilimanjaro – the Uhuru Peak.

Our view of Kili right before heading out on our hike to Base Camp

The morning trek took us through the alpine dessert. The trail had a steady include almost the entire way to Base Camp, but we hiked slowly so as to not run out of breath. There were just a few boulders to climb, but nothing compared to the Barranco Wall we scaled yesterday. My leg muscles are pretty sore, especially my calves. I also find that the first hour of hiking is always the hardest as my muscles get warmed up and my shoulders get used to the weight of my daypack. After that, it somehow gets a bit easier.

On the trail to Base Camp with the clouds in the back
Taking a break and doing some posing
Just the alpine desert and clouds behind us

We made it to Base Camp in 2h 40 mins. At 4,673 m elevation, Base Camp is 678 m higher than our camp from the night before. Here we could see the ending point of a glacier at one of Kili’s peaks.

Made it to Base Camp
And we’re going there tonight!
Signing into Base Camp. This is a big deal!
Now the real work begins

Base Camp is full of tents everywhere. There are people like us, who are planning to summit. But there are also people who have already summited and they’re coming down the mountain to pick up their stuff from their tents. There’s a different energy here as we can actually see people hiking down the mountain’s slope. Those that are incoming are congratulating those who summited and are now outgoing.

Tents everywhere! There was a huge group of students with 20 identical tents set up side by side

The sun was very strong when we first arrived at Base Camp. It’s easy to get sunburnt if you’re not careful. There is however a chilly wind blowing through the camp, so a jacket is still necessary.

Resting while waiting for our lunch

After having a hot lunch, the guides ushered us to take a nap. I think I only slept for two hours since out tent is stuffy from the relentless sun. I also had a headache today hiking to Base Camp. After taking some ibuprofen, it got better, but after napping I feel like it’s coming back. I’m not sure if the headache is due to altitude or dehydration (I drank barely 2L yesterday) or hunger (I didn’t eat well last night) or lack of proper sleep (the cold nights continue preventing me from sleeping well).

Killing some time and reading in the afternoon after our nap
Staying hydrated before tackling the summit

There are also cute little mice running around, scavenging for food. We first noticed them at our lunch stop at the Lava Tower, but to see them at this altitude in this barren landscape is a wonder.

So the plan for the rest of the day is as follows: around 5:00 pm we will have an early dinner, then we will nap again until 11:00 pm, at which point we will pack our daypack and get ready. We should be on the trail around midnight, equipped with our headlamps to light the path. It should take anywhere between 6 to 8 hours to reach the Uhuru Peak summit, just in time to hopefully take some nice photos right after sunrise. After that, we will descend back to Base Camp for brunch and then descend further to Mweka hut for dinner and our last night on the mountain.

Kilimanjaro, we’re ready for you!

I’m actually quite nervous. I really hope we can make it to the Top of Africa!

Day 7 – Started from the bottom, now we’re here
Date: Aug 21, 2017
Start: Base Camp (4,673 amsl)
End: Mweka Camp (3,100 amsl)

We made it! We climbed to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro – Africa’s highest mountain! Wow, what an accomplishment! It feels a bit surreal right now actually, probably because we’re sleep deprived and exhausted. Most importantly I can tell you that it wasn’t easy.

We made it!

So we woke up from our evening nap yesterday around 11:00 pm. We packed our daypacks and organized our belongings that would stay down at Base Camp while we climb. Around 11:30 pm, we had some warm tea and cookies just to warm up our stomachs. Then in pitch darkness at 12:15 am (that is 15 mins past midnight) we started our ascent.

It was cool to see lines of headlamps above and below us as we climbed. Against the backdrop of the night sky littered with stars and pitch darkness all around us, the headlamps were kind of beautiful. They also let us know that we weren’t the only ones climbing to the peak.

It was freezing outside! The wind was also incredibly cold and strong enough to make you lose your balance at times. Luckily we were prepared with our gear. I wore no less than five layers on the top: 100% wool base layer t-shirt, 100% wool base layer long-sleeved shirt, a fleece, and two jackets – one on top of the other. On the bottom I wore two layers of thermal underwear, my hiking pants and finally rain-pants that we rented from our tour company. On my head, I wore a hat liner, my alpaca wool hat and the hood from my red jacket. I also had thick gloves on my hands and a fleece scarf to cover my face from the wind.

Rami’s gear was similar – five layers on top, three on the bottom, three on his head, thick gloves and a bandana to cover his face. Can you imagine how much clothes we were wearing?! But it was all worth it as we didn’t feel the cold except for on our faces.

The trail was very steep. The cold wind kept blowing in our faces without stopping at all. Our noses ran from the cold and our throats were dry from breathing in cold air.

Climbing to the peak coupled with all the previous days of hiking and camping was easily the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life from a physical perspective. Rami and I were both worried about getting sick from the altitude even though we’ve done so much acclimatization over the last few days. But in the end, it wasn’t altitude sickness that got us – it was back pain. Maybe because we weren’t using hiking poles or maybe because our back muscles are weak, but our backs started aching around the two-hour mark.

At first the pain was easy to ignore as I concentrated on shielding my face from the wind, but soon enough I had to request a break and just lie on top of a flat boulder to release the pressure. This worked for about two minutes as the pain returned when we resumed our climb.

I must admit I had my weak moments. Quitting wasn’t an option of course. I didn’t just camp in the freezing cold nights just to quit! Sitting on a rock for too long was not an option either as without movement, you would feel cold within a minute. The only way was up.

But the back pain was pretty bad. There were a couple of times when my eyes swelled with tears as I realized that I had to endure this pain for several hours more. During one particular break, I once again stretched out on a rock and looked up into the sky. With no cloud cover, the sky was full of bright stars. Then, all of a sudden I saw two shooting stars! I pointed them out to Rami and secretly made a wish that we would both make it to the peak.

I’d love to say that that was a turning moment for me, but alas it was not. Rami and I continued to climb through the back pain, and my emotions bounced from being sad and tired to frustrated.

Mentally, the most challenging part of the climb was not knowing just how close you are to the top or to the important milestone called Stella Point. At an elevation of 5,756 m, Stella Point is just 45-60 mins away from the ultimate peak – the Uhuru Peak. But in the darkness, it was impossible to judge for ourselves how close we were to Stella Point. Our guides could tell us roughly how much time was left to reach it, but Rami and I both found it hard to be in the darkness about our progress.

In fact, I saw the sign for Stella Point so suddenly that I was shocked that we finally reached it. It came out of nowhere! The sun was just starting to peek above the horizon, so the sign was still enveloped in darkness and difficult to see from afar.

Finally at Stella Point I felt happy and relieved. Our guides hugged us and said we were doing great. We each had a cup of hot ginger tea from a thermos the guides took along with them, and then we were back on the trail towards the peak.

As the sun came up, we could finally appreciate our surroundings. We passed by several glaciers on our left, situated against the perfect backdrop of a blanket of clouds. To our right, we saw the gigantic crater that was once spewing lava when this volcano was active.

With the glacier behind us
The crater of Kilimanjaro. Apparently it’s possible to camp here for one night, but it would be absolutely freezing

Ahead of us was THE SIGN! The sign that we made it to Uhuru Peak! We made it to the Top of Africa! The rising sun illuminated the sign perfectly for us.
All in all, we started our climb at 12:15 am and reached the peak at 6:40 am. From Base Camp, this means that we climbed 1,222 m in 6 hrs 25 mins. Despite being at 5,895 m above sea level, we didn’t feel altitude sick at all.

We conquered it!
Canada represent!
With our awesome team! We couldn’t have made it up there without their support and encouragement
Super happy to have completed this!
As one of our guides said, “No pain, no gain”

After taking some pictures in the freezing cold (it was -18oC at least!), we started to head back down. We realized that we were actually one of the first few groups to reach the summit. As we descended, we saw lots of people still trekking towards the peak. With the sun now fully above the horizon, we snapped a photo at Stella Point before heading all the way down to Base Camp.

At Stella Point, now that we could actually see it in the sunlight

We used a slightly different trail to descend. It was full of rocky sand, which made it fairly easy to glide down, albeit dangerous. Despite finally using hiking poles for going down, our knees started to ache. We also noticed a pair of Japanese guys that had to be carried down by their guides due to altitude sickness, despite reaching the summit successfully just moments before us.

Sliding down through the rocky sand all the way back to Base Camp

We made it back to Base Camp at 9:15 am. At that time, we ended up taking a quick one-hour nap in our tent since we didn’t sleep at night. After that, we had a quick lunch, changed into lighter clothes and set out descending towards Mweka Camp.

Our descent took about 3.5 hours, but it started raining and there were a lot of rocks on the trail. Right now our knees hurt from all the pressure of going downhill, especially on muddy and slippery rocks. The Mweka Camp sits at 3,100 m above sea level, which means that in addition to climbing to the peak of Kilimanjaro, we also descended almost 2,800 m today. We popped some ibuprofen to help our knees recover.

The rocky and muddy path down to Mweka Camp
So tired!

Overall, I’m very happy with what we have been able to achieve. It definitely wasn’t easy. I’m proud of myself and of Rami for persevering through the back pain, through the cold wind, and through climbing such a challenging trail. We heard from our guide that not everyone who started the climb with us today made it to the top. Some people have failed. And others, like the Japanese guys, succumbed to altitude even after reaching the peak. I guess I’ll take back pain and achy knees over failure any day.

Day 8 – Asante sana, Kilimanjaro
Date: Aug 22, 2017
Start: Mweka Camp (3,100 amsl)
End: Mweka Gate (1,640 amsl)

The Mweka Camp where we spent our last night on the mountain was back in the rainforest climate zone. You could feel the humidity in the air even though the weather was still cool.

Both Rami and I must have passed out from the long day when we finally got into our sleeping bags for the night. We both slept through the entire night without waking up.

In the morning, after breakfast, we gathered with our entire team to tell them “Asante sana” or “Thank you very much” for taking such good care of us and making our trek as comfortable as possible. In return, they sang us once more a song about Kilimanjaro. I loved how everyone on that team always had a positive attitude and a smile on their faces. They truly did a great job always having our tent ready and feeding us lots of good food.

Thank you to our entire team for making our journey to the top as comfortable as possible

Afterwards we started hiking down the last stretch of the mountain to the Mweka gate. It actually started raining, so the trail was very muddy and slippery in some places. Rami and I both wore our rain jackets and realized that on this trip, we really put every single piece of technical clothing that we had to the test!

Starting our final descent down to the gate
Now it’s an easy downhill trek
Really happy to be finally going down the mountain

It took us about 2.5 hours to reach the Mweka gate, descending almost 1,500 m down to an elevation of 1,640 m above sea level.

Yes, we did it!
The other end of the finish sign

It was a bit unbelievable to see all the vehicles waiting to pick up the hikers after the Kili trek. In a way, it was also a big relief to finally feel that we finished this journey. At this point, I was also day-dreaming about finally taking a shower after eight days of the camping lifestyle.

We signed a Kilimanjaro comment book at the tourist hut and then hopped into our van to drive back to our hotel. At the hotel, the staff congratulated us and our guides presented us with certificates of achievement.

It’s a nice touch to receive certificates of completion to commemorate our achievement
I’m definitely hanging this on the wall!

As more and more people congratulated us, the significance of our accomplishment started to sink in. After all, not everybody made it to the top. We later learned that one young woman from Germany had to quit after two hours of climbing on summit night because she simply felt too cold, despite wearing five layers of clothing. However, her boyfriend continued on and I remember seeing him at the summit.

So what has this journey taught me? First, I think our mind is a powerful thing. If we really want something bad enough, then we can find the strength within us to achieve it. Rami’s mantra throughout the entire summit night was “Mind over body, mind over body,” which I think sums up how strong our willpower can be despite physical pain.

Second, despite the fact that we were all strangers to each other, I heard words of encouragement every time I sat down on a rock to rest. “Don’t give up!” a guide from another tour company would urge me as he passed by with his group. “You are so close already!” I would hear through the darkness. I think challenges like this can bring out a sense of community or brotherhood in people. In fact, our own guides nicknamed Rami as Simba, like the lion from the Lion King. As for me, they called me “dada”, which means “sister” in Swahili. “Dada, you made it!” said our guide Issa to me when we reached Stella Point. “Simba!” they would exclaim whenever Rami reached a major milestone. It was a nice feeling to know that in the end, we were all together, united by a common goal to reach the top.

Finally, I think this journey taught me that no matter how intimidating a challenge can be, it’s possible to conquer it “Pole, pole”, one step at a time. This experience has been so different from anything that I’ve done before, and I am certain I will remember it for years and years to come.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *